What my 16 year old self thought of Twilight – A painful read

So, as I often do, I was scrolling through my Facebook memories the other morning, relishing snapshots of life from the BC (Before Covid) era. On this particular morning, though, I stumbled upon something that my 16 year old self had very boldly dubbed an article. The article in question is about the first Twilight movie and in it, I assert my belief that people will struggle to find true love after reading or watching Twilight because – oh God, I’m so mortified that I ever thought this – no one will live up to Edward Cullen. For your reading pleasure, here is the so-called article in all its unedited glory. Also, I feel like I should preface this article by apologising for my claim that Twilight was ‘the best thing to happen to literature in a while’.

The 2008 movie Twilight, based upon the popular novel by American author, Stephenie Meyer, had gained a huge fan base before it was even released.

I read the book when I was the tender age of fourteen and in year nine in secondary school. It had been recommended to me by a friend and at a first glance, I did not actually believe that I would enjoy it despite my passion for reading. However, upon purchasing the copy and starting my journey into this wonderful world of mystery, love and darkness, I became hooked. Twilight became my brand of heroin.

Soon afterwards, I bought the next book in the series, New Moon. It was so well written that I, and I imagine others did too, pined for Edward Cullen when he left Bella. I furiously read on until they were reunited and soon afterwards, Eclipse became available.

During this time, I seemed isolated from the rest of the world because I never actually realised how popular the series was becoming worldwide until I attempted to purchase the long awaited Breaking Dawn. Foolishly, I waited until the day after it’s release to go and buy it and by the time I had arrived in Waterstone’s (a popular UK bookstore), all copies had been sold.

Heartbroken, I and numerous other fan girls, staggered in shock to the cash desk and demanded to know if they had any more copies in their stock room. They didn’t. I quickly signed a slip and gave my debit card details so I could ensure a copy was reserved when more became available.

They arrived a week later and my Summer was lightened even though it rained constantly simply because of this book.
A few months afterwards the movie came out and girls and perhaps boys too, literally swooned over Robert Pattinson as he pulled off the role of the alluring Edward Cullen perfectly.

The obsession for the Twilight series in the UK and the USA has become obvious but after a recent conversation with a friend, we thought about what this would mean for men. After reading the books and watching the movie, my friend and I dreamt of finding our own Edward Cullen. I’m positive others did too.

However, we were sorely disappointed when no man lived up to the expectations we had been so determined to find; a sexy, alluring voice, mysteriousness, a need to protect and a gracefulness in his whole body, no matter what situation he was faced with.

The Twilight series is the best thing to happen to literature in while but now we have to question, is it too good? Edward Cullen is the definition of perfection and any girl, no matter what her interests are or what her situation is, probably dreams of finding a partner like him after reading the books or watching the movie.

Is the Twilight phenomena affecting our chances of a true, loving and stable relationship due to the images of immortal, beautiful and mysterious men being injected into our minds? Only time will tell.

Were you a Twilight fan back in the day? Let me know in the comments!

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