Manchester

The world is falling apart around us.

Terrorism is creeping around this planet like some sort of parasite, choking the life and vitality out of it, but it’s important that we remember one crucial thing during these dark times.

Muslims aren’t the enemy; terrorists are.

So often in the wake of these attacks, people take to Facebook and Twitter, blasting immigrants and criticizing innocent Muslims who simply want to go about their lives just like anyone else.

But blaming the entire global Muslim population for the actions of one group of crazed individuals is like blaming the entire Christian population for the actions of the KKK. It’s like blaming every single Irish person for the 1996 IRA bombing of Manchester.

ISIS aren’t acting in the name of Islam, despite what they claim. They’re monsters who have deliberately misinterpreted the Quran in a pathetic attempt to justify their own warped agenda.

The events of Manchester have really shook me. Manchester was my home for three years and two of my old housemates were in the arena when the bomb went off. It’s a city that took me under its wing when I was nothing more than a naive teenager. Manchester taught me the importance of lending a helping hand to those in need and being kind to all you meet. Manchester and its people taught me the importance of always being yourself, regardless of what other people may think and the fact that someone attempted to destroy these fundamental values is awful.

But I use the word ‘attempted’ because whatever ISIS do, they haven’t yet destroyed the human spirit. Manchester pulled together in the wake of last night’s bomb – hotels opened their doors to children who had lost their friends, siblings and parents, taxi drivers waived fares, locals opened their homes to those unable to get out the city, takeaways handed out free food and drink…it’s the Mancunian spirit in its purest form and it’s a trend mirrored in cities all over the world. When ISIS attack, people pray for the dead and tend to the wounded, they comfort the bereaved and they try their damned hardest to carry on as normally as humanly possible. The human spirit has so far proved indestructible and I hope it can weather whatever else these bastards have to throw at it.

Since ISIS began on their path of destruction, countless innocent lives have been lost and it’s the deaths of young children that really get to me. Bright futures snuffed out in seconds in wave after wave of senseless violence.

How can anyone wake up with intention of wreaking as much pain and suffering as they can? 

 

13 thoughts on “Manchester

  1. Really poignant post.

    Terrorism is wrong regardless and when the terrorists twist their religious rhetoric to their own sick ways in an attempt to justify it, no, just no, the world can’t abide that sh#t.

    But when it’s young children who suffer and are killed it makes it even worse, one was only 8 years old, no chance at life, never harmed anyone, nothing can justify what they did and it takes a real sick b#stard regardless of their race or culture to knowingly bomb somewhere that they knew would contain lots of children. The spirit to band together in adversity is there but sadly the world is going to sh#t.

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    1. I can’t even began to imagine the pain of the parents who have lost children to terrorism. That little girl who died last night should have been at school today, telling her friends and teachers about what a great time she’d had. No child should have to suffer in that way and no parent should have to send their child for a fun evening out and face the risk of never seeing them smile or laugh again. You’re right, the world is going to shit 😦 It’s terrifying thinking of where it might end 😦

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  2. Beautifully written. It’s so upsetting to hear of this- another attack. I hadn’t actually heard of the bombing until this morning. I heard everyone talking and was completely oblivious. It’s so awful to hear of something like this. I bet it was extremely scary to have had friends there. I can’t begin to imagine how shaken they must have been, must still be. It’s awful to say but there’s nothing we can do but pray for all of the families destroyed by this event. It’s nice to know that the community came together though. But still horrible to know of all the children who lost their lives/were injured by this horrific event. It really sets this paranoia in you, except it’s completely justified.

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    1. The united front Manchester have displayed is the only positive thing to come out of this attack. I feel so sorry for the children who have lost their parents too. There was a heartbreaking story about a teenager desperately trying to find her parents. Sadly, they’d been in the foyer waiting for her and didn’t survive 😦 So many lives changed in the course of a few seconds. It doesn’t bear thinking about. You’re right, it really does get you paranoid. We’ve got armed police and army personnel patrolling streets – even in my city, which is pretty small – and while it’s somewhat comforting knowing that the threat is being taken seriously, it makes you anticipate another attack at any moment 😦

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    1. I know what you mean 😦 I heard one interview with a woman who said she was telling children the explosion had been a balloon bursting, trying to calm them down because they were hysterical 😦

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    1. Thank you ❤ It upsets me greatly when any city in the world is targeted in this way, but the attack on Manchester felt so close to home. It pains me even more knowing that there some countries in the Middle East that endure these kinds of losses on a daily basis. How has the world gotten into this state? No children should have their parents torn from their lives by conflict and terror. No parent should have to bury their children before they've even had a chance to live. Nobody should have to live under constant threat. No one should have to wonder if they'll live to see the next day, every single day of the year.

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      1. It’s horrible. So horrible. And I know we’re should try not to give into the fear, but it’s so hard when you think of what they’re going through. My heart breaks for every single person who was there.

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  3. I cannot start to fathom what goes behind those minds. I won’t call them crazy because the horror is they are fully aware of what they are doing.. But I am sick of the lumping up of all Muslims in the same bag. It’s the same after every attack, we’ve had our share in France, and it just makes me sad to see people giving those terrorists the power to divide us.

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    1. I know, right? It’s horrific to think that someone would actively plan and carry out such an attack on a venue they KNEW would be full of children.

      Mosques were targeted on the day following this attack 😦 Apparently a lot of mosques were the targets of arsonists. The perpetrators of such attacks see it as ‘justice’, but what they’re doing is nothing more than lowering themselves to the level of terrorists by instilling terror in innocent people. It’s a sad and dangerous world for everyone right now, but in particular Muslims 😦 A lot of people conveniently forget that a lot of the people who helped the victims of this attack are Muslims themselves. There was a woman on Twitter speaking about how scary it was being at the arena that night and someone responded with “That’s what happens when you let Muslims in the country.” Her response? “Actually, it was a Muslim taxi driver who took us home”. So many people forget that true Muslims are just as horrified by ISIS’s actions as the rest of the world 😦

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